Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
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When Duke Ludwig the Wealthy of Bavaria-Landshut founded Bavaria's first university with a papal concession in 1472, no one could imagine that over the next five hundred years it would move twice and emerge as one of the largest universities in Germany, providing some of the country's strongest research. The university began with four faculties in Ingolstadt, where it witnessed the flowering of German humanism and played a major role in the Counter-Reformation. The move to Landshut saw the growing influence of the Enlightenment on the university. The second move, this time to the heart of the royal capital Munich, brought an expansion of the faculties and a huge advance in the sciences. Today LMU Munich has matured into one of the world’s leading international universities, fully competitive with the other major institutions of higher learning and research. It continues to build on its distinct identity and its core skills in research and instruction in order to confront both academic challenges and the hugely complex demands of our changing world.
  • Ingolstadt (1472 - 1800)

    Ingolstadt

    Duke Ludwig the Wealthy of Bavaria-Landshut founded Bavaria's first university with a papal concession in 1472. The Ingolstadt university started with four faculties. The Faculty of Arts was mandatory and thus represented an undergraduate program of sorts. Its completion qualified a student for the other three faculties: medicine, jurisprudence, or theology. more

  • Landshut (1800 - 1826)

    Temporary quarters in Landshut

    In 1800, the university was relocated to Landshut by Prince Elector Max IV Joseph of Bavaria (King Maximilian I after 1806). Named after both him and Ludwig the Wealthy in 1802, it has been known as the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität ever since. more

  • Munich (1826 - 1945)

    New rooms in Munich

    As one of his first acts, the new King Ludwig I brought the university to Munich in 1826. In 1840, it took up residence in today’s main building, designed by architect Friedrich von Gärtner. more

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