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LMU Data Science Lab

Assistance for data analysts

München, 06/20/2016

Nowadays, employers expect computer programmers to do more than programming. They must also be able to implement ideas. In LMU’s Data Science Lab, students can test their own ideas and search for solutions to real business problems.

Source: Taiga - fotolia.com

Data analysts locate and select data sources, evaluate and interpret them, and present the results in an easily comprehensible form – and they must be prepared to deal with a wide variety of topics. “Every firm that generates large amounts of data must be able to interpret them, and this is where the data analyst comes in, says Dr. Tobias Emrich of LMU’s Teaching and Research Unit for Database Systems. Data scientists are specialists who convert large datasets into an interpretable and understandable form: They are the data miners who extract the valuable nuggets of useful information from large quantities of irrelevant slag.

The Data Science Lab program at LMU offers students the opportunity to learn how project ideas can be transformed into practically useful form, and to become acquainted with the range of application of big data. Students, researchers and commercial firms work together on realistic problems with which professional data analysts are confronted daily. The Data Science Lab thus serves as an interface between academic data science and the practical needs of business firms. Students work with real datasets provided by real companies, and can exercise and enhance their analytical skills with the support of LMU’s informatics specialists. The participating firms can look forward to receiving concrete proposals for the solution of their problems in the area of data science, and are stimulated to hire graduates with a demonstrated ability to handle these problems. Moreover, the projects undertaken by students in the program involve the analysis of highly diverse datasets. These include data collected at CERN, where physicists who are probing the subatomic structure of matter, data generated by car manufacturers, and data relating to metal fatigue in aging gas turbines.

To complement the Data Science Lab, LMU is setting up a new laboratory, in which students from all LMU faculties can work on projects that involve the analysis of large datasets. The new laboratory is equipped with state-of-the-art technology, providing users with optimal facilities for problem-solving.

For further information: http://dsl.ifi.lmu.de/data-science-lab